Fort Polk Guardian 01-24-2020

The preamble to the Manual for Courts-Mar- tial states, “(t)he purpose of military law is to promote justice, to assist in maintaining good or- der and discipline in the armed forces, to pro- mote efficiency and effectiveness in the military establishment, and thereby strengthen the national security of the United States.” At the Joint Readiness Training Cen- ter and Fort Polk, the Commanding General and subordinate commanders take good order and discipline serious- ly. Across Fort Polk, the following disciplinary issues continue to be prevalent: sexual assault, driving under the influence, wrongful use/pos- session of controlled substances, fraternization, inappropriate relationships and domestic vio- lence. Below are recent examples of adverse legal actions across the installation. A staff sergeant, assigned to Operations Group, Joint Readiness Training Center, was is- sued a General Officer Memorandum of Repri- mand for having an extramarital relationship with a woman who was not his spouse. A sergeant, assigned to 2d Battalion, 4th In- fantry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, was punished under Article 15 for failing to obey a lawful order by wrongful- ly using a government vehicle for other than offi- cial purposes and for dereliction of duty, in viola- tion of Article 92, Uniform Code of Military Jus- tice (UCMJ). The service member was sentenced to reduc- tion to the grade of E-4, 45 days of extra duty, 45 days of restriction, and an oral reprimand. A specialist, assigned to 2d Battalion, 4th In- fantry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, was punished under Article 15 for failing to report to his appointed place of duty, in violation of Article 86, UCMJ. The serv- ice member was sentenced to 45 days extra duty. A specialist, assigned to 2d Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, was issued a General Officer Memo- randum of Reprimand for driving un- der the influence of alcohol, provid- ing a breath sample that indicated a breath alcohol content of .161%. A specialist, assigned to 2d Battalion, 4th In- fantry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, was punished under Article 15 for disobeying a lawful order by wrongfully possessing alcohol on the Southwest Border Mis- sion, in violation of Article 92, UCMJ. The serv- ice member was sentenced to reduction to the grade of E-1, 45 days of extra duty, and 45 days of restriction. A private first class, assigned to 2d Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, was punished under Article 15 for failing to obey a lawful general or- der by wrongfully using a government vehicle for other than official purposes and for consum- ing alcohol on the Southwest Border Mission, in violation of Article 92, UCMJ. The service member was sentenced to reduc- tion to the grade of E-1, forfeiture of $840 pay per month for two months, 45 days of extra duty, and 45 days of restriction. Guardian Jan. 24, 2020 NewScope AAFES events The Army & Air Force Exchange Serv- ice is ready to help military shoppers share the love during February with deals on Valentine’s Day gifts that will have them singing love songs all month long. Fresh flowers, gifts and candy will be available at Fort Polk Main Exchange, Ex- press 1, and Express 3 for Valentine’s Day. Fresh flowers can be purchased from $5.99 to $29.99. Exchange shoppers, including honor- ably discharged Veterans, can cross buying gifts off their to-do lists from home by vis- iting ShopMyExchange.com for all their sweetheart’s needs. Designers Choice Bouquets will be avail- able for purchase online and shipped to ad- dresses in the continental United States. Orders must be placed by Feb. 11 to arrive by Valentine’s Day. The Army and Air Force Exchange Service at Fort Polk is providing Soldiers and the military community with the tools needed to stay ready and resilient in the new year. Military shoppers can find the latest athletic apparel and shoes, fitness trackers and workout equipment — every- thing they need to live a BE FIT lifestyle — at the Fort Polk Exchange and at Shop- MyExchange.com. Super Bowl events Watch the San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs during Super Bowl LIVE Feb. 2 at 4 p.m. at two locations: The Anvil Bar and the Forge Bar and Grill (fam- ily friendly). Free pizza, wings, and nachos at the Anvil. Taco bar at the Forge Bar and Grill. Door prizes at both including a 65- inch T.V. Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers also hosts Super Bowl Live Feb. 2 at 5 p.m. at the Home of Heroes Recreation Center. Bring your friends for food, fun, door prizes and more as you watch the game and root for your favorite team. Follow on FB For information you can use, photos, videos and more, follow the Joint Readi- ness Training Center and Fort Polk on Face book. Just go to your account and search forJRTC and Fort Polk. Valentine wine, tapas The community is invited to attend a Valentine Wine and Tapas Feb. 14 from 6-9 p.m. at the Warrior Center. Cost is $25. Registration required. Must be 21 or older. For more informa- tion call (337) 531-4440. Briefs /3 As tensions around the world rise, service members, Families, civilian workers and friends may become targets of online threats, monitor- ing, bullying and spoofing. There are many unscrupulous people and or- ganizations waiting to take advantage of some- one to gain access to financial accounts, informa- tion or to create fear or mistrust. Please be careful who you friend, what you post and who is following you on social media. Below are some easy things you can do to help protect your privacy and security. 1. If someone you don’t know wants to be your friend, check their profile and find out who they are. If you don’t see a reason they should want to know you, deny the request. 2. Review your settings and decide if you want everyone in the world to know your busi- ness or just those you select or those who are your friends. 3. Don't post anything that may compromise a military mission, such as a unit's location, its mission, key dates and times, routes and meth- ods of movement. Remember you can either help protect deployed forces or you be a threat to them. 4. Educate your family and friends about cy- ber security and why it's important. 5. If you see suspicious activity, are threatened, harassed, or your social media accounts get hacked, please contact the social media platform, law enforcement, the Criminal Investigation Di- vision or your service member’s command and report it. As the saying goes, "Bad things happen when good people do nothing. To protect yourself from identity theft 1. Secure your Social Security number. Don't carry your Social Security card in your wallet. Only give out your SSN when necessary. 2. Don't share personal information (birthdate, Social Security number, or bank account number) because someone asks for it. 3. Collect mail every day. Place a hold on your mail when you are away from home for more than a few days. 4. Pay attention to your billing cycles tooltip . If bills or financial statements are late, contact the sender. 5. Use the security features tooltip on your mobile phone. 7. Review your credit card and bank account statements. Compare receipts with account state- ments. Watch for unauthorized transactions. 8. Shred receipts, credit offers, account state- ments, and expired credit cards. This can prevent “dumpster divers” from getting your personal information. 9. Store personal information in a safe place. Protect yourself from threats of social media, identity theft STAFF JUDGE ADVOCATE’S OFFICE Justice Beat: Good order, discipline serious matter INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT COMMAND

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