Fort Polk Guardian 09-14-2018

Vol. 45, No. 37 Published for the community of Fort Polk, La. Sept. 14, 2018 Guardian Fort Polk Inside the Guardian Polk remembers 9/11 .. 3 BJACH news ................ 8 Rotation pictures ........ 9 Smoke detectors ........ 11 Hurricanes ................ 12 Warrior Hills Golf ....... 14 www.jrtc-polk.army.mil Weekend weather Today Saturday Sunday 90 91 92 73 40% 50% 50% 72 72 Rain chance Rain chance Rain chance FORT POLK, La. — When Afghan-born Spc. Ali Rezai, 3rd Bat- talion, 353rd Armor Regiment, Joint Readiness Training Center Opera- tions Group, joined the Army in July 2016, he did it for a number of reasons. “Before I came to America in 2015, I was an interpreter and cul- tural advisor in Afghanistan for al- most six years. When I moved here (to the United States), I kind of missed that Army life, and I have a passion for it,” Rezai said during a phone interview from Airborne School in Fort Benning, Ga., Sept. 12. “I also wanted to do something that I knew my Family and friends would be proud of.” Rezai said an- other reason he joined was to take advantage of the educa- tional benefits available through Army schools, which appealed to his ambition to learn as much as possible. Now he’s taken that am- bition a step further by earning the elite Ranger tab. “Ranger School was something that I al- ways wanted to do because I knew it was challeng- ing,” he said. “I always want to be the best ex- ample I can be for others to follow, I have always wanted to lead, and this was a way to accomplish those goals.” Rezai’s military occupational spe- cialty, 09L, is interpreter/translator — a comparatively small career field in the Army. Rezai speaks five languages: Dari, Pashto, Farsi, Tajik and Urdu. With Rezai’s Ranger qualification (and soon-to-be Air- borne qualification) tacked on, this Soldier is unique among his peers and the first at Fort Polk and in the Army to have those exact creden- tials, according to Lt. Col. Javier Lopez and Command Sgt. Maj. Steven Campbell, commander and command sergeant major respec- tively, 3rd Bn, 353rd Armor Reg. Lopez said Rezai is the kind of high-energy, loyal Soldier that every commander/command sergeant major/first sergeant wants in his formation. “He is dedicated, physically fit, humble and believes in his mission. He wants to contribute to the Army,” Lopez said. “He is the first 09L in the Army to receive the Ranger tab, and that is signifi- cant.” Being the first linguist to become a Ranger makes Rezai some- thing of a history maker. “I always want to make history if it means making a difference,” he said. Campbell said Rezai’s upward mobility in the Army is greatly im- proved now that he has the Ranger tab. “This opens a lot of doors and opportunities for him,” said Camp- bell. “At some point in his career he wants to try out for Special Forces, so this was a test for him to see if he could do it. I think he absolutely can.” Campbell flew to Fort Benning along with 1st Sgt. Matthew Carter, A Company first sergeant (both men are Rangers) to attend the gradua- tion and tack on Rezai’s Ranger tab. In addition, four Soldiers from the unit made the drive to watch their brother-in-arms graduate. This was a complete surprise to Rezai. “It means a lot that the com- mand sergeant major came to my graduation, but he had told me as we were filling out the paperwork that if I passed he would attend my graduation, and he kept that prom- ise,” he said. “But I felt very proud that my buddies came to see me graduate, and that must mean something for them to see me and (know I am) the first linguist to graduate from Ranger School. My older brother from Nashville, Ten- nessee, also came, and that was pretty awesome.” Another first for JRTC, Fort Polk, Army Army linguist first to earns Ranger tab By JEAN DUBIEL Guardian staff writer Please see Ranger page 5 COURTESY Command Sgt. Maj. Steven Campbell, 3rd Battalion, 353rd Armor Regiment, Joint Readiness Training Center Opera- tions Group, places the RangerTab on Spc. Ali Rezai. Vol. 45, No. 37 Published for the community of F rt Polk, La. Sept. 14, 2018 ardi Fort Polk Inside the Guardian Polk reme bers 9/11 .. 3 BJACH news ... 8 Rota ion pictures ... 9 Smoke det ctors ... 11 Hurricanes ... 12 Warrio Hills Golf ... 14 ww .jrtc-polk.army. il Week nd weather Today Saturday Sunday 90 91 92 73 40% 50% 50% 72 72 Rain ch ce Rain ch ce Rain ch ce FORT POLK, La. — When Afghan-born Spc. Ali Rezai, 3rd Bat- talion, 353rd A mo Regiment, Joint Readiness Training Center Opera- tions Group, joined the Army in July 2016, he did it for a number of reasons. “Befor I came to America n 2015, I was an interpr ter and cul- tural advisor in Afghanist for al- most six years. When I moved h re (to the United States), I kind of missed that Army life, and I have passion f r it,” Rezai said during a phone intervi w from Airborne School in Fort Benning, Ga., Sept. 12. “I also wanted o do something that I knew my Family and friends would be proud f.” Rezai said n- other r ason he joined was to take dv ntage of the educa- tional benefits available through Army schools, which appealed to his ambition t learn s much as po sible. Now he’s taken that am- bition a step furthe by earning the elit Ranger tab. “Ranger School was something that I al- ways wanted to do because I knew it was challeng- ing,” he said. “I always want to be the best ex- ample I can be for others to follow, I have lways wanted o lead, nd this was a w y to accomplish those goals.” Rezai’s military occupational spe- cialty, 09L, is interpr ter/ ransl tor — a comparatively small career field n the Army. Rezai speaks five langua es: Dari, Pashto, Farsi, Tajik and Urdu. With Rezai’s Ranger qualification (a d soon-t -be Air- borne qualification) tacked on, this Soldier is uniq e among his peers and the first at Fort Polk and i the Army to have those exact creden- tials, ccording to Lt. Col. Javier Lopez and Command Sgt. Maj. Steven Campbell, commander and command sergeant major respec- tively, 3rd Bn, 353rd A mo Reg. Lopez said Rezai is the kind of high-energy, lo a Soldier that every commander/command sergeant major/first sergeant wants i h s formation. “He is dedicated, physically fit, humble and believ s in his mission. He wants to contribute to the Army,” Lopez said. “He is the first 09L in the Army to receive th Ranger tab, nd that is s gnifi- cant.” Being the first linguist to become a Ranger makes Rezai some- thing of a history maker. “I always want to make history if it means making a difference,” h said. Campbell said Rezai’s upward mobility in the Army is greatly im- proved now that e has the Ranger tab. “This opens a lot of d ors and opp rtuni ies for him,” said Camp- bell. “At some point in h s career h wants to try out for Special Forces, so this wa a test for him to see if he could do it. I hink he absolutely can.” Campbell flew to F rt Benning along with 1st Sg . Matthew Carter, A Company first sergeant (bo h men are Rangers) to a tend the gradu - tion and tack on Rezai’s Ranger tab. In addition, four Soldiers from the unit made th drive to watch heir brother-in-arms gradu te. This was a complete surprise to Rezai. “It means lot that t e com- mand sergeant major came to my gradu tion, but he had told me as we re filling out the paperwo k that if I passed h would attend my gradu tion, a d he kept that prom- ise,” he said. “But I felt v ry p oud that my buddies came to see m gradu te, and that must mean something for them to see m and (know I am) the first linguist to radu te from Ranger School. My older brother from Nashville, T n- esse , also came, and that was pretty awesome.” Another first for JRTC, Fort Polk, Army Army linguist first o earns Ranger tab By JEAN DUBIEL Guardian st ff writer Pleas se Ranger page 5 COURTESY Command Sgt. Maj. Steven Campbell, 3rd Battalion, 353rd Armo Regiment, Joint Readiness Training Center Opera- tions Group, places the RangerTab on Spc. Ali Rezai.

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NDQ2NjA1